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2017 Blackout Tracker Results are tabulated and ready for review.
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2017 Blackout Tracker Results

2017 Blackout Tracker Results

2017 Blackout Tracker Results Are Out

Every year, Eaton puts together a Blackout Tracker report.  This year, the 10th year for the report, is packed full of interesting and enlightening information about how and when the power went out around the country.

This annual report is based on reported power outages in the U.S., with sources of data including:
news services, newspapers, websites (including those of newspapers and TV stations) and personal accounts.

We at hope that you not only find this report insightful, but that it prompts you to take appropriate action to prepare for power outages that could affect you and your business.

 

The main body of the report follows this introduction and is organized into two sections:

  1. Overview of national power outage data
  2. Power outage data by state

 

In all, 3,526 outages were tabulated and used as the basis for the 2017 Blackout Tracker report, a reduction of nearly 9 percent compared to the 3,879 outages we tracked in 2016. However, the number of people affected by outages more than doubled — increasing by almost 19 million from 2016 to 2017. It is important to note that complete data is often unavailable on certain aspects of reported outages, including the number of people affected and the duration of the blackout.

Price tags for data center outages continue to soar

The costs associated with data center power outages continue to rise, a fact confirmed by the Ponemon Institute in The 2016 Cost of Data Center Outages report. The group, which polled 63 data center organizations in the U.S. that had experienced an outage in the past 12 months, found the average cost of a data center outage in 2015 was a staggering $740,357. The price tag was up 38 percent from 2010, while the increase in the maximum downtime cost ($2,409,991) was even greater, climbing 81 percent over that same time period.

Email us at info@ecsintl.com for additional info in this report!

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